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King County Elections
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Renton, WA 98057-2906

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King County Local Voters' Pamphlet

August 4, 2015 Primary And Special Election

City, City of Seattle 
Council District No. 3



Morgan Beach



Morgan Beach


Education: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates
Occupation: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates

Statement:

Seattle is an exciting, progressive city. However, out of the 50 biggest cities in the United States, Seattle is last when it comes to paying woman the same as men. According to the National Partnership for Woman and Families, a full-time employed woman in Seattle makes just 73 cents for every dollar earned by a man.

 

I’ll rely on my experience at the American Red Cross, on the Seattle Women’s Commission, as a legislative district chair for Planned Parenthood Votes, as a coordinator for the Puget Sound Blood Center and my Master’s Degree in Public Policy to provide progressive leadership on this and other top priorities. This includes building a better relationship between the community and police to reduce crime and stop excessive force. It includes ensuring developers are paying their fair share for affordable housing. It also includes a municipal broadband network to give average citizens and business startups an affordable entry to high speed internet in today’s global economy.

 

Most importantly, I’ll focus on equal pay for equal work. Seattle led the nation with landmark $15 minimum wage legislation and paid sick leave policy. There is no reason we can’t be as innovative ensuring all genders are treated fairly. Here’s what I would do:

 

Ensure 12 weeks of parental leave for city employees: The City of Seattle is off to a good start with four weeks. However, it’s time for the City to join the rest of the world and give employees the time they need to start in their role as parents. 

 

Close the wage gap at the city: We need to close our wage gap among city employees by completing salary and position changes within one year and build a sustainable pipeline for recruitment, promotion and equity in all departments. The City of Seattle has to set an example as an employer.

 

More accountability and transparency with wage data: The complex issues that perpetuate the wage gap mean we don’t have quick fixes for the problem. But there is proof that tracking and transparency of wage data holds employers accountable. This begins with ensuring all companies applying for city contracts pay woman comparably. San Francisco has already passed this legislation. This law would require city contractors report their employees’ pay confidentially to the city’s Human Rights Commission. 

 

Together, we can ensure economic justice for all and have a collaborative City Hall. I ask for your vote.

 



For more information:

PO BOX 22025
SEATTLE, WA 98122
(425) 298-3073
morgan.beach@gmail.com
www.morganbeach.org

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Rod Hearne



Rod Hearne


Education: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates
Occupation: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates

Statement:

We are justifiably frustrated with City Hall. We’re frustrated with the entrenched downtown group-think that seems far more concerned with consolidating power and serving its own interests. But we also don’t want grandstanding, divisiveness, and bombastic rhetoric. We need a council that empowers our neighborhoods and diverse communities.  We need to create a functional atmosphere for genuine dialogue.

 

I want to bring the same coalition-building approach to City Hall that I brought to the movement for marriage equality. As Executive Director of Equal Rights Washington I made sustainable, lasting change by bringing together people of faith, labor, business and civil rights groups. We empowered people to tell their stories, and by telling their stories they were able to affect change. That’s what we need to do in City Hall.

 

Our city has issues to overcome. Seattle’s rapid growth is creating difficult challenges that the current political dialogue has been unable to address.

 

Public Safety:  Our streets need to be safe for all.  We need quick response times to incidents, but we also need accountability with our police force.  Effective policing shouldn’t come at the cost of citizen rights, and we need to take steps to ensure everyone is safe on our streets. 

 

Affordability: We need to create living wage jobs and housing options that reflect the diversity of our city. We cannot continue to price out the middle class.

 

Transportation:  The city needs a realistic plan that prioritizes transportation for the future; transit systems that work together, not at odds with one another, and will help commuters avoid traffic.  We must address repairing streets and safe sidewalks for pedestrians. 

 

Let’s grow Seattle’s ability to be a place for justice, sustainability, arts, culture and innovation. Let’s make Seattle even stronger.

 

We need a bridge builder, not a bridge burner. That’s who I am.

 

Proudly endorsed by Democratic and progressive leaders: former Seattle Deputy Mayors Bob Watt and Bill Stafford; former Seattle City Councilmember and Senior Policy Advisor to Mayor Ed Murray, Tina Podlodowski; Congressman Derek Kilmer; Rep. Joan McBride; Rep. Laurie Jinkins; King County Councilmember Rod Dembowski, among many others.



For more information:

PO BOX 9100
SEATTLE, WA 98109
(206) 486-0085
info@rodhearne.com
www.rodhearne.com

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Lee Carter



Lee Carter


Education: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates
Occupation: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates

Statement:

The centralization of urban government in Seattle, and urban areas across the nation, has destroyed community self-management and citizen participation. And, in the words of the late U.S. Senator, Mark Hatfield, “… we must reverse this trend and develop our cities along the lines of neighborhood government and inter-neighborhood cooperation.” Today, the citizens of Seattle can help realize the Oregon Senator’s dream, but first we must prepare ourselves, by recalling the past.

 

It’s been said that luck is where preparation and opportunity meet, if that’s true, then luck is on the side of Seattle citizens, because the opportunity to create a new form of urban government is before us, and the City’s activist past has prepared us to meet the challenge.

 

America’s first “neighborhood council” was formed in Seattle by business and civic leaders of the African American, Japanese American and Chinese American communities, after WWII.  Almost all of them, and the people of their communities, were residents of the Central Area (the only area where blacks could own a home in Seattle), and Chinatown (now known as the International District).

 

The Jackson Street Community Council, as it was named, had a board of Directors, a paid staff, and published the City’s first integrated business directory. Over time, seeing the political impact of the Jackson Street Council, surrounding neighborhoods formed their own community council’s. During the mid 60s, they all organized into the Central Seattle Community Council Federation (CSCCF), and became a neighborhood force.

 

Eventually reaching a membership of more than 80 Councils and other community-based organizations, the Federation helped to bring an end to housing segregation; an end to school segregation (without a court order), and, an end to the practice of “redlining” by the banking and insurance industries. But, today the Federation no longer exists.

 

This campaign is focused on the issues facing our senior citizens (housing, poverty, quality of life), knowing that the real solutions to those and all the other issues facing us, can only come from the people that make up our neighborhoods.

 

As a former reporter, and a past Executive Director of the Central Seattle Community Council Federation, I’ve seen the effectiveness of “neighborhood power.” It proves that active citizen participation forces government accountability, and corporate responsibility. As a Council member, my priority would be to use the tools of the office to empower existing Councils, which could eventually lead to neighborhood government.



For more information:

P.O. BOX 22433
SEATTLE, WA 98122
(206) 494-5731
contact@leecarterdistrict3.com
www.leecarterdistrict3.com

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Kshama Sawant



Kshama Sawant


Education: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates
Occupation: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates

Statement:

Like so many of you, I want to live in a city based on social justice. A city free of discrimination and poverty, with racial and gender equality, where all people can work and live in dignity.

 

But the reality is far different. Our city is becoming increasingly unequal and unaffordable.

 

Since my election in 2013, I have helped to lead the opposition to the corporate agenda in Seattle.

 

Working together with labor and progressive movements, I'm proud of what we have accomplished, including:

  • Passed a $15/hour minimum wage - delivering on my campaign promise within five months of taking office
  • Alongside tenants and community activists, we defeated 400% rent hikes at SHA housing
  • Won millions of dollars in additional social services funding
  • Passed funding for a year-round, low-barrier women’s shelter
  • Working together with Councilmember O'Brien, led the way in opposing the anti-worker, anti-environment Trans-Pacific Partnership

In the words of Councilmember Nick Licata, “Without a doubt, Kshama has moved the council in a new direction, more progressive ... Kshama has made things happen that never would have happened before.”

 

Moving forward as your councilmember, I am committed to:

  • Tackling head-on the crisis of skyrocketing rents by fighting for rent control; making big developers pay to fund affordable housing; establishing a Tenants’ Bill of Rights; and building thousands of high-quality, city-owned, affordable apartments rented at below-market rates
  • Massively expanding public transit
  • Taxing the rich to fully fund our social services
  • Implementing Municipal Broadband

As a representative of working people, I do not take a penny in corporate cash. While the rest of the City Councilmembers pay themselves $120,000/year, I only take the average worker’s wage and donate the rest to social justice movements.

 

I am proud to be endorsed by King County Councilmember Larry Gossett, State Senator Pramila Jayapal, former Mayor Mike McGinn, and over 30 community organizations and unions, including Sierra Club, Transit Riders Union, UFCW 21, SEIU 775, 1199, 925 and 6, Teamsters 117, 174 and 763, IAM 751, ILWU 19, Socialist Alternative, National Women's Political Caucus of WA, and many, many more.

For too long our government has been dominated by establishment politicians beholden to big developers. I ask for your vote to continue providing a voice for working people on Seattle City Council. Let’s work together to make Seattle affordable for all!



For more information:

PO BOX 85862
SEATTLE, WA 98145
(206) 486-0099
contact@KshamaSawant.org
www.KshamaSawant.org

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Pamela Banks



Pamela Banks


Education: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates
Occupation: Section not used by City of Seattle candidates

Statement:

“I’ve spent my career uniting people to address complex problems, making progress on racial and economic justice, fair wages for women, and safe, affordable housing for all. For 20 years, I’ve called District 3 home, as a community and non-profit volunteer, former President of the Garfield PTSA and CEO of the Seattle Urban League. With your vote, I’ll bring our progressive values AND neighborhood priorities to City Hall. We need both if we are to truly move Seattle forward.”

 

Proven Progressive Leadership: Pamela Banks began as a community organizer and union member, working in Seattle neighborhoods to ensure city programs reached underserved residents and communities. She has a strong track record of reducing disparities in education, employment, housing and health.  We need her dedication and passion working for us in City Hall.

 

Affordability For All: Committed to addressing the affordable housing crisis, Pamela is the ONLY candidate in this race who actually helped residents stay in their homes by working with banks. She understands we need a variety of policies to meet the diverse needs of our community -- from controlling growth in rents to increasing the supply of affordable housing.

 

Public Safety Improvements: Families and businesses need improved police response and involvement, and we must better address crime in all our neighborhoods. A vocal advocate for police reform, Pamela knows that bringing law enforcement closer to the community improves safety and accountability. 

 

Strong Neighborhood Schools: Pamela understands the connection between education and opportunity, particularly for youth of color. A single mother, Pamela volunteered at her son’s schools and helped build after-school and athletic programs. Her tenacity improved the lives of youth in District 3, and she will continue to fight for education at City Hall.

 

Green, Smart Transportation: At a candidates forum it was revealed that Pamela is the ONLY District 3 candidate who rides Metro, a lifeline for so many working people, students and commuters. She understands that good transit means healthier lives and a stronger economy. Pamela will lead the effort to build a smart connected network that moves all of us efficiently, while reducing our carbon footprint.

 

Pamela is proudly endorsed by: King County Young Democrats, former Executive Ron Sims, Seattle Councilmember Bruce Harrell, State Representatives Eric Pettigrew, Sharon Tomiko Santos, former Mayors Nickels, Rice, Royer and Uhlman, and Rev. Samuel B. McKinney, Alison Holcomb, Jon Bridge, Ruth Woo and Nate Miles.     



For more information:

800 FIFTH AVENUE SUITE 101-329
SEATTLE, WA 98104
(206) 682-7328
info@electpamelabanks.com
www.electpamelabanks.com

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